Est. 1986 Owner Philip Spooner is a trusted and specialist Antique Arms and Armour dealer in the UK.

2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983

2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, very rare. SN X1983

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A very rare 2.7mm Kolibri Self-loading Pistol in its original case, 2 ¾” overall 1 ½” barrel, 2mm smooth bore barrel, blued action with German proofs, numbered 32. Chequered ebonite grips with Kolibri trade-mark and the monogram 'FP'. In its original leather cloth box with green lining and tin for bullets.

Circa 1912-14                                                                                                          

In very good condition with near all its original finish

The diminutive little Kolibri pistol is a world record holder twice over. Not only is it the world’s smallest centre- fire semi-automatic pistol, it also takes the world’s smallest centre-fire round of ammunition. The brainchild of Austrian watchmaker Franz Pfannl and with financial help from Georg Grabner, it used flash powder as a propellant to increase apparent effectiveness and was only produced in very small numbers. It was not a commercial success.